Parenting with Less

When we brought Willow home from the hospital I realized that she only had four toys. We have no baby gym, no play mat, not even a rattle. I started to get a little anxious that she would become behind developmentally because these things are what would help her progress. I was believing the lie that her development was dependent on possessions and not interactions.

I was believing the lie that her development was dependent on possessions and not interactions

Unfortunately this is what companies want us to believe. Within one week of being home with her, I had three different emails from companies trying to sell me app subscriptions that would “Enhance Willow’s everyday interactions to get the best developmental progress possible.“ What an easy sell? Who doesn’t want their child to hit developmental milestones on time? It was all very tempting!

Thankfully Chris and I had already had conversations about how we wanted to parent Willow. We had already decided what was important to us and on the top of that list was Simplicity.

Marie Kondo’s Tidying Up has swept through our nation like none of us were ever taught us how to clean before. I haven’t watched the show but what I hope she addresses is there isn’t a need for huge purges of donated items when you don’t bring too much stuff into your house in the first place.

There isn’t a need for huge purges of donated items when you don’t bring too much stuff into your house in the first place.

I have always been “anti crap” with intermittent phases of irresponsible spending. (Ask my husband about my bullet journaling phase.) I don’t know if it was growing up with way too much stuff or experiencing cultures who had way less, but I learned early on that happiness is not tied to the things we own.

It seems like every major life event is marked by showers of stuff. Quite literally we throw showers where the whole point is to receive things, necessary or not. And don’t hear me wrong, I loved every shower we had, less for the gifts and more for the love each person showed our growing family.

But what I don’t want is a house full of things and not memories. And while those aren’t mutually exclusive we put way too much emphasis on the stuff in our child’s life. When I think back to my own childhood I have a very hard time remembering one toy that I was fond of. I’m sure there were plenty of them but the novelty fades and then were off wanting to new latest and greatest.

Simplicity Parenting by Kim John Pay address 4 areas where children are being overwhelmed by daily life. He stresses that they have too much stuff, too many choices, too much information and their days are moving too fast.

I will be diving into these areas in the coming months and ironing out how we navigate our fast paced world with a desire to parent our little girl in a different stream.

What are you doing to simplify your child’s life? Let me know in the comments below!